Turbulent flow
around a rotating cylinder

From recent work using Large Eddy Simulation

Flexible filaments in a cross-flow
From the PEL-Skin project

simulation using Lattice Boltzmann in colour, experimental flow visualisation in greyscale




The University of Manchester

adapted from a photo I took of Sackville Street Building.



Playing around with the Reynolds Tank
The 'birthplace' of turbulence.

Parts of the apparatus used by Prof Osbourne Reynolds in 1894.

About

Hello and Welcome!

My name is Alistair (Ali) Revell, and these pages describe some of the work I do with colleagues and members of my research group at The University of Manchester. I'm a senior lecturer in The School of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering (MACE), where I also completed my PhD in turbulence modelling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Our research is extremely varied, and whether I'm teaching turbulence, developing computer simulation software or helping to develop the School's Social Responsibility agenda - the days are always full!. These pages should give a better idea of what all that involves!

Short bio: I graduated from UMIST in 2002 with a degree in Aerospace Engineering with French (MEng 1st class), where I also spend a 4 month placement at ENSMA, Poitiers. I then moved on to a PhD split between The University of Manchester and The IMFT, Toulouse, which also included a placement at EDF in Paris and time at CTR in Stanford. More recently I spent 4 months in Madrid with the numerical simulation group in CIEMAT. More details about my work can be found here.

Out of work: I’m Dad to two girls, Alma and Matilda, and husband to Bea. I’m a pretty big football fan and have followed Watford FC as long as I can remember. I still play hockey every now and then though not as much these days, otherwise I enjoy woodwork and DIY, playing with (and breaking) new tech and the latest gadgets, good food, art and the great outdoors.

So far: academia has been a fantastic experience for me, and I'm grateful to have had the chance to work on many exciting projects with a range of great people from all around the world. Basically it seems everything in academia is collaborative in some shape or form and so these pages also constitute a big thank you to all those who have helped me in the past!